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Wear Pink in Awareness for Breast Cancer Month!

Pink ribbon symbolic bow color raising awareness on people living with tumor Breast cancer

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual campaign to raise awareness of breast cancer risks, the value of screening and early detection, and treatment options available to women and men who are diagnosed with one of the many forms of breast cancer.

More than 249,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with invasive breast cancer every year, and nearly 41,000 die from the disease. Over the years, a loop of pink ribbon has come to symbolize breast cancer awareness, and today the image of a pink ribbon can be found emblazoned on thousands of products, from apparel to dishware to office supplies. But there’s more to awareness than just wearing pink. Breast cancer is the second most common kind of cancer in women. About 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point. The good news is that most women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early. A mammogram – the screening test for breast cancer – can help find breast cancer early when it’s easier to treat. National Breast Cancer Awareness Month is a chance to raise awareness about the importance of early detection of breast cancer. Make a difference! Spread the word about mammograms and encourage communities, organizations, families, and individuals to get involved.

How can National Breast Cancer Awareness Month make a difference?

We can use this opportunity to spread the word about steps women can take to detect breast cancer early.

Here are just a few ideas:

  1. Ask doctors and nurses to speak to women about the importance of getting screened for breast cancer.
  2. Encourage women ages 40 to 49 to talk with their doctors about when to start getting mammograms.
  3. Organize an event to talk with women ages 50 to 74 in your community about getting mammograms every 2 years.

To help raise awareness you can do something as simple as wearing pink, wear a pink ribbon, or even sign up to do the Susan G. Komen 3 day walk. There is so much you can do but always remember to ask your doctor to get screened and make sure to get a mammogram.

If you or a loved one has breast cancer and need help with it please call Relevar Home Care at (586) 493-7677. We service many counties including Macomb and Wayne.